Past Preconferences

2016

ICA Preconference

Crossing Borders: Researching Transnational Media History

Sponsored by the Communication History Division

Fukuoka Sea Hawk Hotel, 9 June 2016



8:10 – 8:30 – Welcome

8:30 – 9:50 – Parallel Sessions 1 & 2

Room 1 – Crossing the Iron Curtain: Producing and Exchanging Media Content during the Cold War

  • Dreaming of European Media during the Cold War: Louis Armand and the Tour Lumière Cybernétique Project (1965-1971), Dominique Trudel
  • The transnational past as global present: Challenges to journalistic practice at Radio Free Europe during the cold war, Susan D. Haas
  • ‘Colossal Misunderstanding': The Transnational Media Narration of the Fall of the Berlin Wall, Julia Sonnevend

Chair: Richard Popp

Room 2 – Intercultural Exchange and Media Diplomacy

  • Transforming Symbolisms: Reinterpreting the Goddess of Democracy as the Victims of Communism Memorial, Samantha Oliver
  • Managing China’s Image Through Their Eyes: Co-optation, Co-operation and Western Journalists in Wartime China, 1937-1945, Yong Volz
  • Shifting Kanji transnationally: Japan’s national language program and a U.S. Japanese-language newspaper before and after WWII, Kristin Gustafson & Rena Kawasaki
  • Beyond Western Europe: public service broadcasting as a global historical moment, Jerome Bourdon & Nahuel Ribke

Chair: Nour Halabi

9:50 – 10:10 – Coffee Break

10:10 – 11:30 – Parallel Sessions 3 & 4

Room 1 – News, Music and Propaganda on the Airwaves

  • Listening in Secret: The BBC Polish Service 1939-45, Suzanne Franks & Agnieszka Morriss
  • Reaching the Colonial Territories in Africa and Asia: Portuguese Media Content travelling to the Empire, Nelson Ribeiro, Rogério Santos & Sílvio Santos
  • Transnational Modernity: The Case of Radio Ceylon, Biswarup Sen
  • Radio ‘in Translation’ – how the pioneers of UK independent local radio (ILR) in the 1970s adapted, and were inspired by, the practices and output of commercial radio in North America and Australasia, Richard Rudin

Chair: David Park

Room 2 – Transborder Influences on Media Production and Content

  • ‘Americanization of the Press': The Success of American Journalism in the Habsburg Empire, 1850-1910, Gabriele Melischek & Josef Seethaler
  • Pacific Crossings? American Progressivism and the Making of Journalism in China from the Late 19th Century to 1920s, Junbin Su
  • The German immigration and its impact on the development of an advertising industry: The Case of the Land of Israel in the 1930s, Osnat Roth-Cohen
  • Transnational Magazine Work in the Interwar Period: Erich Salomon and Stefan Lorant, Annie Rudd

Chair: Manuel Menke

11:30 – 12:10 – Keynote

How Holidays Travel: The Case of Purim, Elihu Katz & Menahem Blondheim

  • Chair: Nelson Ribeiro
  • Discussant: Michael Schudson

12:10 – 13:00 – Lunch

13:00 – 14:20 – Parallel Sessions 5 & 6

Room 1 – Empires, Surveillance & Control

  • An Empire that Innis Missed: Time and Space Biases in the Persian Empire according to the Biblical Book of Esther, Elihu Katz & Menahem Blondheim
  • The British Ministry of Information as Transnational Publisher, Marc Wiggam
  • BBC Monitoring – Watching the World, Suzanne Franks

Chair: Nour Halabi

Room 2 – Narratives and Reception in Transnational Media

  • The PRESSA (International Press Exhibition Cologne 1928) and the conceptualisation of the press as a transnational agent of peace, Stephanie Seul
  • Broadcasting in the Cause of Peace, David Goodman
  • Spreading Vice: The establishment of Vice Magazine and Vice Media as transnational phenomenon in the 1990s, Henrik Bødker
  • Transnational media-reception as a mundane practice: Historical development of routines, motives and logics of cross-border media use, Christian Schwarzenegger

Chair: Nicole Maurantonio

14:20 – 14:40 – Coffee Break

14:40 – 16:00 – Parallel Sessions 7 & 8

Room 1 – Communicating Transnational History

  • History sells! But what kind of historical narratives are sold? An analysis of the presentation of transnational history in European popular history magazines, Manuel Menke & Susanne Kinnebrock
  • Producing global media memories: Media events and the power dynamics of transnational television history, Lars Lundgren & Christine E. Evans
  • “The 10 most evil people in history”– How Ordinary People Communicate History in Social Media: (Trans)national Perspectives, Historical Factuality and the race for maximized attention, Christian Schwarzenegger
  • Transnational History and Media Memories: Facebook as Transnational Digital Archive?, Anne Kaun & Fredrik Stiernstedt

Chair: Thomas Birkner

Respondent: Gabrielle Balbi

Room 2 – Media Form and Content: Transnational Circulation

  • Learn to produce classic TV: BBC’s influences on China’s early television drama production, George Guo
  • “Fashion” in the Socialism New China: The Chinese version of international fashion magazines during the 1980s and 1990s, Xiyang Tang
  • Beyond Orientalism, or who’s the “great imitator?”: Critical reflections on Japanese transcultural influence, Fabienne Darling-Wolf
  • Japanese animation as a model of cross-cultural communication, Vincenzo De Masi

Chair: Nelson Ribeiro

16:10 – 17:00 – Roundtable

Researching Transnational Media History: Theoretical and Methodological Challenges

  • Barbie Zelizer
  • Sandra Braman
  • Susanne Kinnebrock

Chair: David Park

2015

ICA Preconference: Communications and the State: Toward a New International History

Sponsored by the Communication History Division

San Juan, Puerto Rico

Held on May 21, 2015





8:30 AM

Welcome

8:40 AM – 10:00 AM

Communications and the State in the Early Modern Era

  • “The Cotswold Olimpick Games: Sport, Politics and Faith in early modern England,” Mark Brewin (The University of Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States)
  • “Misunderstanding the Mongols: Intercultural Communication in Three Thirteenth-Century Franciscan Travel Accounts,” Kathryn Montalbano (Columbia University, New York, United States)
  • “A Republic Run as a Chamber of Commerce: The Role of the State in Structuring Communications in Renaissance Venice,” Juraj Kittler (St. Lawrence University, New York, United States)
  • “The Post Office and State Formation in World Historical Time,” Lane Harris (Furman University, South Carolina, United States)

  • Moderator: Rick Popp (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, United States)

10:00 AM – 10:15 AM

Coffee

10:15 AM – 11:35 AM

Communication Networks — Mail, Telegraph, Telephone

  • “Communications and the States: The Swiss Influence on the origins of ITU, 1855-1876,” Gabriele Balbi (Università della Svizzera italiana, Lugano, Switzerland), Simone Fari, Giuseppe Richeri.
  • “Mail Order Fraud, Postal Inspectors, and the Remaking of Consumer Capitalism in the United States, 1850-1900,” Rick Popp (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, United States)
  • “Media of Resistance: Organizing the Anti-Colonial Movements in the Dutch East Indies, 1920-1927,” Rianne Subijanto (University of Colorado Boulder, United States)
  • “International Copyright and Access to Education: A History,” Sara Bannerman (McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada)

  • Moderator: Christine Evans (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, United States)

11:35 AM – 12:40 PM

Lunch

  • Participants provide their own lunch

12:40 PM – 2:00 PM

International Dimensions of Broadcasting and the State

  • “News and Propaganda in the Cold War: Associated Press and the Voice of America, 1945-1952,” Gene Allen (Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada)
  • “Colonization through Broadcasting: Rádio Clube de Moçambique and the Promotion of Portuguese Colonial Policy,” Nelson Ribeiro (Catholic University of Portugal, Lisbon, Portugal)
  • “A House Divided: The SABC during World War Two,” Ruth Teer-Tomaselli (University KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa)
  • “Subsidizing Content and Conduit: Global Wireless Communications and the State,” Heidi Tworek (Harvard University, United States)

  • Moderator: Dominique Trudel (New York University, United States)

Communications and the State: The Case of Germany

  • “A Story of Transition and Failure? The State and the East German Media Reform 1989-1991,” Mandy Tröger (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, United States)
  • “Presence and Absence: The Berlin Wall as a Strategic Platform,” Samantha Oliver (University of Pennsylvania, United States)
  • “Heads of State as Communicators: A Comparative Analysis of State of the Union Addresses of American Presidents and Regierungserklärungen of German Chancellors since 1945/49,” Thomas Birkner (Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Münster, Germany)
  • “The Necessary Restraints of National Security: Cold War U.S. Government-Journalism Negotiations and the Communist Reaction,” Mike Conway (Indiana University, United States) and Kevin Grieves (Ohio University, United States)

  • Moderator: Dave Park (Lake Forest College, United States)

2:00 PM – 2:15 PM

Coffee

2:15 PM – 3:35 PM

The State and Infrastructure

  • “How the French State did not Construct Nicholas Schöffer’s Tour Lumière Cybernétique?,” Dominique Trudel (New York University, United States)
  • “Minitel and the State,” Julien Mailland (Indiana University, United States) and Kevin Driscoll (Microsoft Research, United States)
  • “Connected and Divided: Satellite Networks as Infrastructures of Live Television,” Christine Evans (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, United States) and Lars Lundgren (Södertörn University, Sweden)

  • Moderator: Mike Conway (Indiana University, United States)

The State and Communication Across Borders

  • “Media, Communications and the State in the Nordic Region: The History of the Media Welfare State,” Trine Syvertsen and Gunn Enli (University of Oslo, Norway), Ole J. Mjøs and Hallvard Moe (University of Bergen, Norway)
  • “‘Home Is Where Your Heart Is': Mediated Longing for the State,” Ekaterina Kalinina (Södertörn University, Sweden) and Manuel Menke (Augsburg University, Germany)
  • “Theorizing Political Communication Policies,” Tim Vos (University of Missouri, United States)
  • “Commercial cross-border radio: Popular culture, advertising, and the erosion of state communication power in comparative perspective: Britain, India and America,” John Jenks (Dominican University, United States)

  • Moderator: Heidi Tworek (Harvard University, United States)

3:45 PM – 5:00 PM

Closing Plenary: The State of the Field

  • Daniel Hallin (University of California, San Diego, United States)
  • Richard John (Columbia University, United States)
  • Adrian Johns (University of Chicago, United States)

  • Moderator: Michael Stamm (Michigan State University, United States)

Preconference Organizers: Gene Allen, Ryerson University and Michael Stamm, Michigan State University.

Contact: Gene Allen, gene.allen@ryerson.ca


2014

ICA Preconference: Making Sense of Memory & History

Sponsored by the Communication History Division

Museum of History and Industry, Seattle, WA, USA

May 22, 2014

The Communication History Division of ICA had a highly successful sponsored preconference, “Making Sense of Memory & History,” May 22, 2014 at Seattle’s Museum of History & Industry (MOHAI). An impressive day of panels and roundtables were scheduled, and the conference was attended by a cross-field, cross-disciplinary program featuring scholars within communication studies, rhetoric, public history, and the digital humanities more broadly.

Featured panelists include:

Preconference Outline

History and memory—two modes of thinking about the past that often appear at odds—have an intimate, albeit at times strained, intellectual relationship. Despite the argued antagonism between history and memory studies, historians

Natalie Zemon Davis and Randolph Starn suggested in their introduction to the 1989 special issue of Representations that, “Rather than insisting on the opposition between memory and history, then, we want to emphasize their interdependence… If anything, it is the tension or outright conflict between history and memory that seem necessary and productive. The explosive pertinence of a remembered detail may challenge repressive or merely complacent systems of prescriptive memory or history; memory, like the body, may speak in a language that reasoned inquiry will not hear” (5). Following Davis & Starn, this preconference proposes to grapple with this tension between history and memory, exploring the varied ways in which scholars, from a variety of subfields within communication studies and across the humanities, have engaged with this relationship in recent years. Through its emphasis upon cross-field, cross-disciplinary connections, this preconference will highlight new directions within memory studies, build upon existing theoretical and methodological frameworks as well as opening a space for new and reconsidered perspectives that capitalize upon the interdisciplinarity of memory studies and the possibilities of new technologies.

Preconference Organizers: Nicole Maurantonio, University of Richmond and David W. Park, Lake Forest College.

Contact: Nicole Maurantonio, nmaurant@richmond.edu




2013

ICA Preconference: New Histories of Communication Study

Sponsored by the Communication History Interest Group in concert with the history sections of ECREA and IAMCR

The preconference took place at London Metropolitan University on June 16 & 17, 2013


Preconference Attendees


Cropped DSC_5207


Special thanks to Sheila Lodge, Philip Lodge, Rachel Lodge, and London Metropolitan University
.

This preconference seeks to broaden, internationalize, and advance the history of communication study as a family of overlapping configurations and practices. It aims to bring together scholars from ICA, ECREA, IAMCR, NCA, and select rhetoric societies in an effort to stoke new, cross-national and cross-field conversations about the study of communication in long and broad historical perspective. It aspires to push the empirical and theoretical boundaries of histories and pre-histories of the field by attending to overlooked research areas, emerging conceptual orientations, and new axes of understanding and comparison among distinct traditions cutting across communication, media studies, cultural studies, journalism, and rhetoric, among other fields—and across institutional, intellectual, social, cultural, discursive, and material history. More specifically, it takes as its aims:

(1). To further internationalize the history of the fields and subfields of communication through papers that

  • are centered on world regions or nations that have received relatively little historical attention to this point;
  • are focused on the history of trans-national flows of influence, ideas, paradigms, texts, methods, research technologies, people, politics, power, other agentic forces contributing to the study of communication in the past; or
  • take up comparative analysis across nations or regions.

(2). To deepen, enrich, and empirically fill out the history of communication study through papers that

  • throw light on understudied dimensions of the academic study of communication as it developed over time;
  • make use of archival materials, oral histories, or other primary sources that have not found their way into the published history of the field to date, or have been underused;
  • advance a social history of the field that goes beyond ‘great men,’ landmark texts, and dominant forms of research—drawing attention, e.g., to patterns of labor, ordinary practitioners, pedagogical texts and practices, and points of articulation with everyday life and with publics beyond the academy;
  • provide institutional histories of important departments, journals, and professional associations
  • apply historical consideration to domains that have received less attention than some other subfields in the extant historiography of the field, including: internet studies, interpersonal communication research, forgotten avenues of communication research, marginal formations of all kinds, and more;
  • bring newer or under-utilized theoretical paradigms and analytic frameworks to bear on the history of the field—e.g. new materialisms, archaeology, post-colonial and critical race theory, feminist theory, and queer theory; or
  • critically engage existing histories and revise dominant understandings of individuals, institutions, ideas, schools, and practices.

(3). To broaden and cross-fertilize the history of communication study and related academic and non-academic fields through papers that

  • consider commercial, governmental, philanthropic, religious, therapeutic, or other non-academic versions of the study of communication as a family of social practices; or
  • draw out points of intellectual or socio-historical connection among communication-related fields whose histories and presents have often been kept separate of one another—e.g. rhetoric, hermeneutics, literary studies, journalism studies/Zeitungwissenschaft, information, media studies, cultural studies, and social scientific communication research.

Preconference Organizers: David W. Park, Lake Forest College, and Peter Simonson, University of Colorado.

Contact: David W. Park, park@lfc.edu




2012

ICA Preconference
Sponsored by the Communication History Interest Group
Held in Phoenix, AZ, on May 24, 2012



This ICA preconference brought together communication scholars pursuing historiographic work as well as various historians addressing areas of interest to communication scholars. The preconference succeeded in its goal to provoke intersections and encounters to set in motion potential interventions with urgent issues currently facing our discipline, schools, communities, and countries.

The day’s schedule remains online

  • Keynote address by Anna Everett, Professor of Film and Media Studies, University of California at Santa Barbara
  • Invited scholar panel, “What Counts as Communication History?” featuring Norma Coates, Don Wright Faculty of Music and Faculty of Information and Media Studies, University of Western Ontario; and Christian Schwarzenegger, Institute for Media and Educational Technology, Augsburg University.
  • Interactive Korsakow System documentary by Mary Elizabeth Luka
  • Paper presentations from South Africa, Israel, Mexico, Canada, and the United States on recovered histories, critical practice, policy engagements, and interdisciplinarity

Organized by Travers Scott and Devon Powers. Questions? Contact Travers Scott

ICA Preconference

Crossing Borders: Researching Transnational Media History

Sponsored by the Communication History Division

Fukuoka Sea Hawk Hotel, 9 June 2016



8:10 – 8:30 – Welcome

8:30 – 9:50 – Parallel Sessions 1 & 2

Room 1 – Crossing the Iron Curtain: Producing and Exchanging Media Content during the Cold War

  • Dreaming of European Media during the Cold War: Louis Armand and the Tour Lumière Cybernétique Project (1965-1971), Dominique Trudel
  • The transnational past as global present: Challenges to journalistic practice at Radio Free Europe during the cold war, Susan D. Haas
  • ‘Colossal Misunderstanding': The Transnational Media Narration of the Fall of the Berlin Wall, Julia Sonnevend

Chair: Richard Popp

Room 2 – Intercultural Exchange and Media Diplomacy

  • Transforming Symbolisms: Reinterpreting the Goddess of Democracy as the Victims of Communism Memorial, Samantha Oliver
  • Managing China’s Image Through Their Eyes: Co-optation, Co-operation and Western Journalists in Wartime China, 1937-1945, Yong Volz
  • Shifting Kanji transnationally: Japan’s national language program and a U.S. Japanese-language newspaper before and after WWII, Kristin Gustafson & Rena Kawasaki
  • Beyond Western Europe: public service broadcasting as a global historical moment, Jerome Bourdon & Nahuel Ribke

Chair: Nour Halabi

9:50 – 10:10 – Coffee Break

10:10 – 11:30 – Parallel Sessions 3 & 4

Room 1 – News, Music and Propaganda on the Airwaves

  • Listening in Secret: The BBC Polish Service 1939-45, Suzanne Franks & Agnieszka Morriss
  • Reaching the Colonial Territories in Africa and Asia: Portuguese Media Content travelling to the Empire, Nelson Ribeiro, Rogério Santos & Sílvio Santos
  • Transnational Modernity: The Case of Radio Ceylon, Biswarup Sen
  • Radio ‘in Translation’ – how the pioneers of UK independent local radio (ILR) in the 1970s adapted, and were inspired by, the practices and output of commercial radio in North America and Australasia, Richard Rudin

Chair: David Park

Room 2 – Transborder Influences on Media Production and Content

  • ‘Americanization of the Press': The Success of American Journalism in the Habsburg Empire, 1850-1910, Gabriele Melischek & Josef Seethaler
  • Pacific Crossings? American Progressivism and the Making of Journalism in China from the Late 19th Century to 1920s, Junbin Su
  • The German immigration and its impact on the development of an advertising industry: The Case of the Land of Israel in the 1930s, Osnat Roth-Cohen
  • Transnational Magazine Work in the Interwar Period: Erich Salomon and Stefan Lorant, Annie Rudd

Chair: Manuel Menke

11:30 – 12:10 – Keynote

How Holidays Travel: The Case of Purim, Elihu Katz & Menahem Blondheim

  • Chair: Nelson Ribeiro
  • Discussant: Michael Schudson

12:10 – 13:00 – Lunch

13:00 – 14:20 – Parallel Sessions 5 & 6

Room 1 – Empires, Surveillance & Control

  • An Empire that Innis Missed: Time and Space Biases in the Persian Empire according to the Biblical Book of Esther, Elihu Katz & Menahem Blondheim
  • The British Ministry of Information as Transnational Publisher, Marc Wiggam
  • BBC Monitoring – Watching the World, Suzanne Franks

Chair: Nour Halabi

Room 2 – Narratives and Reception in Transnational Media

  • The PRESSA (International Press Exhibition Cologne 1928) and the conceptualisation of the press as a transnational agent of peace, Stephanie Seul
  • Broadcasting in the Cause of Peace, David Goodman
  • Spreading Vice: The establishment of Vice Magazine and Vice Media as transnational phenomenon in the 1990s, Henrik Bødker
  • Transnational media-reception as a mundane practice: Historical development of routines, motives and logics of cross-border media use, Christian Schwarzenegger

Chair: Nicole Maurantonio

14:20 – 14:40 – Coffee Break

14:40 – 16:00 – Parallel Sessions 7 & 8

Room 1 – Communicating Transnational History

  • History sells! But what kind of historical narratives are sold? An analysis of the presentation of transnational history in European popular history magazines, Manuel Menke & Susanne Kinnebrock
  • Producing global media memories: Media events and the power dynamics of transnational television history, Lars Lundgren & Christine E. Evans
  • “The 10 most evil people in history”– How Ordinary People Communicate History in Social Media: (Trans)national Perspectives, Historical Factuality and the race for maximized attention, Christian Schwarzenegger
  • Transnational History and Media Memories: Facebook as Transnational Digital Archive?, Anne Kaun & Fredrik Stiernstedt

Chair: Thomas Birkner

Respondent: Gabrielle Balbi

Room 2 – Media Form and Content: Transnational Circulation

  • Learn to produce classic TV: BBC’s influences on China’s early television drama production, George Guo
  • “Fashion” in the Socialism New China: The Chinese version of international fashion magazines during the 1980s and 1990s, Xiyang Tang
  • Beyond Orientalism, or who’s the “great imitator?”: Critical reflections on Japanese transcultural influence, Fabienne Darling-Wolf
  • Japanese animation as a model of cross-cultural communication, Vincenzo De Masi

Chair: Nelson Ribeiro

16:10 – 17:00 – Roundtable

Researching Transnational Media History: Theoretical and Methodological Challenges

  • Barbie Zelizer
  • Sandra Braman
  • Susanne Kinnebrock

Chair: David Park

2015

ICA Preconference: Communications and the State: Toward a New International History

Sponsored by the Communication History Division

San Juan, Puerto Rico

Held on May 21, 2015





8:30 AM

Welcome

8:40 AM – 10:00 AM

Communications and the State in the Early Modern Era

  • “The Cotswold Olimpick Games: Sport, Politics and Faith in early modern England,” Mark Brewin (The University of Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States)
  • “Misunderstanding the Mongols: Intercultural Communication in Three Thirteenth-Century Franciscan Travel Accounts,” Kathryn Montalbano (Columbia University, New York, United States)
  • “A Republic Run as a Chamber of Commerce: The Role of the State in Structuring Communications in Renaissance Venice,” Juraj Kittler (St. Lawrence University, New York, United States)
  • “The Post Office and State Formation in World Historical Time,” Lane Harris (Furman University, South Carolina, United States)

  • Moderator: Rick Popp (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, United States)

10:00 AM – 10:15 AM

Coffee

10:15 AM – 11:35 AM

Communication Networks — Mail, Telegraph, Telephone

  • “Communications and the States: The Swiss Influence on the origins of ITU, 1855-1876,” Gabriele Balbi (Università della Svizzera italiana, Lugano, Switzerland), Simone Fari, Giuseppe Richeri.
  • “Mail Order Fraud, Postal Inspectors, and the Remaking of Consumer Capitalism in the United States, 1850-1900,” Rick Popp (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, United States)
  • “Media of Resistance: Organizing the Anti-Colonial Movements in the Dutch East Indies, 1920-1927,” Rianne Subijanto (University of Colorado Boulder, United States)
  • “International Copyright and Access to Education: A History,” Sara Bannerman (McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada)

  • Moderator: Christine Evans (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, United States)

11:35 AM – 12:40 PM

Lunch

  • Participants provide their own lunch

12:40 PM – 2:00 PM

International Dimensions of Broadcasting and the State

  • “News and Propaganda in the Cold War: Associated Press and the Voice of America, 1945-1952,” Gene Allen (Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada)
  • “Colonization through Broadcasting: Rádio Clube de Moçambique and the Promotion of Portuguese Colonial Policy,” Nelson Ribeiro (Catholic University of Portugal, Lisbon, Portugal)
  • “A House Divided: The SABC during World War Two,” Ruth Teer-Tomaselli (University KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa)
  • “Subsidizing Content and Conduit: Global Wireless Communications and the State,” Heidi Tworek (Harvard University, United States)

  • Moderator: Dominique Trudel (New York University, United States)

Communications and the State: The Case of Germany

  • “A Story of Transition and Failure? The State and the East German Media Reform 1989-1991,” Mandy Tröger (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, United States)
  • “Presence and Absence: The Berlin Wall as a Strategic Platform,” Samantha Oliver (University of Pennsylvania, United States)
  • “Heads of State as Communicators: A Comparative Analysis of State of the Union Addresses of American Presidents and Regierungserklärungen of German Chancellors since 1945/49,” Thomas Birkner (Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Münster, Germany)
  • “The Necessary Restraints of National Security: Cold War U.S. Government-Journalism Negotiations and the Communist Reaction,” Mike Conway (Indiana University, United States) and Kevin Grieves (Ohio University, United States)

  • Moderator: Dave Park (Lake Forest College, United States)

2:00 PM – 2:15 PM

Coffee

2:15 PM – 3:35 PM

The State and Infrastructure

  • “How the French State did not Construct Nicholas Schöffer’s Tour Lumière Cybernétique?,” Dominique Trudel (New York University, United States)
  • “Minitel and the State,” Julien Mailland (Indiana University, United States) and Kevin Driscoll (Microsoft Research, United States)
  • “Connected and Divided: Satellite Networks as Infrastructures of Live Television,” Christine Evans (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, United States) and Lars Lundgren (Södertörn University, Sweden)

  • Moderator: Mike Conway (Indiana University, United States)

The State and Communication Across Borders

  • “Media, Communications and the State in the Nordic Region: The History of the Media Welfare State,” Trine Syvertsen and Gunn Enli (University of Oslo, Norway), Ole J. Mjøs and Hallvard Moe (University of Bergen, Norway)
  • “‘Home Is Where Your Heart Is': Mediated Longing for the State,” Ekaterina Kalinina (Södertörn University, Sweden) and Manuel Menke (Augsburg University, Germany)
  • “Theorizing Political Communication Policies,” Tim Vos (University of Missouri, United States)
  • “Commercial cross-border radio: Popular culture, advertising, and the erosion of state communication power in comparative perspective: Britain, India and America,” John Jenks (Dominican University, United States)

  • Moderator: Heidi Tworek (Harvard University, United States)

3:45 PM – 5:00 PM

Closing Plenary: The State of the Field

  • Daniel Hallin (University of California, San Diego, United States)
  • Richard John (Columbia University, United States)
  • Adrian Johns (University of Chicago, United States)

  • Moderator: Michael Stamm (Michigan State University, United States)

Preconference Organizers: Gene Allen, Ryerson University and Michael Stamm, Michigan State University.

Contact: Gene Allen, gene.allen@ryerson.ca


2014

ICA Preconference: Making Sense of Memory & History

Sponsored by the Communication History Division

Museum of History and Industry, Seattle, WA, USA

May 22, 2014

The Communication History Division of ICA had a highly successful sponsored preconference, “Making Sense of Memory & History,” May 22, 2014 at Seattle’s Museum of History & Industry (MOHAI). An impressive day of panels and roundtables were scheduled, and the conference was attended by a cross-field, cross-disciplinary program featuring scholars within communication studies, rhetoric, public history, and the digital humanities more broadly.

Featured panelists include:

Preconference Outline

History and memory—two modes of thinking about the past that often appear at odds—have an intimate, albeit at times strained, intellectual relationship. Despite the argued antagonism between history and memory studies, historians

Natalie Zemon Davis and Randolph Starn suggested in their introduction to the 1989 special issue of Representations that, “Rather than insisting on the opposition between memory and history, then, we want to emphasize their interdependence… If anything, it is the tension or outright conflict between history and memory that seem necessary and productive. The explosive pertinence of a remembered detail may challenge repressive or merely complacent systems of prescriptive memory or history; memory, like the body, may speak in a language that reasoned inquiry will not hear” (5). Following Davis & Starn, this preconference proposes to grapple with this tension between history and memory, exploring the varied ways in which scholars, from a variety of subfields within communication studies and across the humanities, have engaged with this relationship in recent years. Through its emphasis upon cross-field, cross-disciplinary connections, this preconference will highlight new directions within memory studies, build upon existing theoretical and methodological frameworks as well as opening a space for new and reconsidered perspectives that capitalize upon the interdisciplinarity of memory studies and the possibilities of new technologies.

Preconference Organizers: Nicole Maurantonio, University of Richmond and David W. Park, Lake Forest College.

Contact: Nicole Maurantonio, nmaurant@richmond.edu




2013

ICA Preconference: New Histories of Communication Study

Sponsored by the Communication History Interest Group in concert with the history sections of ECREA and IAMCR

The preconference took place at London Metropolitan University on June 16 & 17, 2013


Preconference Attendees


Cropped DSC_5207


Special thanks to Sheila Lodge, Philip Lodge, Rachel Lodge, and London Metropolitan University
.

This preconference seeks to broaden, internationalize, and advance the history of communication study as a family of overlapping configurations and practices. It aims to bring together scholars from ICA, ECREA, IAMCR, NCA, and select rhetoric societies in an effort to stoke new, cross-national and cross-field conversations about the study of communication in long and broad historical perspective. It aspires to push the empirical and theoretical boundaries of histories and pre-histories of the field by attending to overlooked research areas, emerging conceptual orientations, and new axes of understanding and comparison among distinct traditions cutting across communication, media studies, cultural studies, journalism, and rhetoric, among other fields—and across institutional, intellectual, social, cultural, discursive, and material history. More specifically, it takes as its aims:

(1). To further internationalize the history of the fields and subfields of communication through papers that

  • are centered on world regions or nations that have received relatively little historical attention to this point;
  • are focused on the history of trans-national flows of influence, ideas, paradigms, texts, methods, research technologies, people, politics, power, other agentic forces contributing to the study of communication in the past; or
  • take up comparative analysis across nations or regions.

(2). To deepen, enrich, and empirically fill out the history of communication study through papers that

  • throw light on understudied dimensions of the academic study of communication as it developed over time;
  • make use of archival materials, oral histories, or other primary sources that have not found their way into the published history of the field to date, or have been underused;
  • advance a social history of the field that goes beyond ‘great men,’ landmark texts, and dominant forms of research—drawing attention, e.g., to patterns of labor, ordinary practitioners, pedagogical texts and practices, and points of articulation with everyday life and with publics beyond the academy;
  • provide institutional histories of important departments, journals, and professional associations
  • apply historical consideration to domains that have received less attention than some other subfields in the extant historiography of the field, including: internet studies, interpersonal communication research, forgotten avenues of communication research, marginal formations of all kinds, and more;
  • bring newer or under-utilized theoretical paradigms and analytic frameworks to bear on the history of the field—e.g. new materialisms, archaeology, post-colonial and critical race theory, feminist theory, and queer theory; or
  • critically engage existing histories and revise dominant understandings of individuals, institutions, ideas, schools, and practices.

(3). To broaden and cross-fertilize the history of communication study and related academic and non-academic fields through papers that

  • consider commercial, governmental, philanthropic, religious, therapeutic, or other non-academic versions of the study of communication as a family of social practices; or
  • draw out points of intellectual or socio-historical connection among communication-related fields whose histories and presents have often been kept separate of one another—e.g. rhetoric, hermeneutics, literary studies, journalism studies/Zeitungwissenschaft, information, media studies, cultural studies, and social scientific communication research.

Preconference Organizers: David W. Park, Lake Forest College, and Peter Simonson, University of Colorado.

Contact: David W. Park, park@lfc.edu




2012

ICA Preconference
Sponsored by the Communication History Interest Group
Held in Phoenix, AZ, on May 24, 2012



This ICA preconference brought together communication scholars pursuing historiographic work as well as various historians addressing areas of interest to communication scholars. The preconference succeeded in its goal to provoke intersections and encounters to set in motion potential interventions with urgent issues currently facing our discipline, schools, communities, and countries.

The day’s schedule remains online

  • Keynote address by Anna Everett, Professor of Film and Media Studies, University of California at Santa Barbara
  • Invited scholar panel, “What Counts as Communication History?” featuring Norma Coates, Don Wright Faculty of Music and Faculty of Information and Media Studies, University of Western Ontario; and Christian Schwarzenegger, Institute for Media and Educational Technology, Augsburg University.
  • Interactive Korsakow System documentary by Mary Elizabeth Luka
  • Paper presentations from South Africa, Israel, Mexico, Canada, and the United States on recovered histories, critical practice, policy engagements, and interdisciplinarity

Organized by Travers Scott and Devon Powers. Questions? Contact Travers Scott