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Message from John Laprise on White House IT Policy Declassification

Posted by on Dec 2, 2013 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Sharon Traweek’s recent post on the SIGCIS listserv about declassification and US government records has prompted me to make an announcement to scholars who are potentially interested such as those in ICA-Comm History. Please feel free to share.

For the past eleven years (six years as a grad student and going on five years as a faculty member), I have been pursuing ongoing research on White House information technology policy. To that end, I have been filing regular and persistent requests at Presidential Libraries (Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush (present)) for documents related to a very wide range of ICT keywords. The keyword list is a living list informed by research. In some cases, these records are available but not yet opened and my filing has the effect of fast tracking their availability. In some cases I’ve filed numerous Freedom of Information Act requests and subsequent appeals to open closed record sets. With classified documents I’ve filed mandatory review requests and subsequent appeals to declassify records. This takes time and persistence. The end result is that in excess of 200k pages of documents are opened that were not previously available on request. This work continues as the Bush Library comes online and I have made the initial requests to open records there.

The long and short of this is that there is a very rich documentary record open and available to interested scholars.

Best regards,

John Laprise, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Communication in Residence

Northwestern University in Qatar

Northwestern University

CFP: CHD-Sponsored Preconference: Making Sense of Memory & History

Posted by on Oct 13, 2013 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

The call for papers for this year’s CHD-sponsored preconference, “Making Sense of Memory & History,” has been posted to the division’s website. The conference, scheduled for May 22, 2014, will take place at the Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) in Seattle. Abstract submissions (300 words) are due to the conference organizers by November 20, 2013, and authors will be informed of acceptance/rejection by December 15, 2013.

Read the full CFP here.

CHIG Now the Communication History Division

Posted by on Jul 15, 2013 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

At the ICA conference in London, the Communication History Interest Group was officially elevated to division status. The group is now the Communication History Division! Congratulations to Philip Lodge, the CHD chair, and the group’s members for the division status, which among other things affords CHD voting status and greater stability.

Prepping for Seattle

Posted by on Jul 15, 2013 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

ICA’s London 2013 conference was a great success, including the Communication History-sponsored sessions, social events, and CH-sponsored preconference, “New Histories of Communication Study”.

ICA will meet in Seattle, USA, next May. See CHD chair Philip Lodge‘s notes about the Seattle conference [pdf], based on the planning meeting in London. See also the notes from the mid-year Board Meeting held in Seattle last January.

CHIG Preconference “New Histories of Communication Study” Schedule Available

Posted by on May 23, 2013 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

The schedule for the CHIG-sponsored preconference “New Histories of Communication Study” is now available.

Participants may also download papers on the password-protected site

The CHIG London Schedule is Available

Posted by on Apr 24, 2013 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

The overall London ICA schedule is available in a number of formats, but we have extracted the CHIG-specific schedule for our website.

The lineup includes more panels than we have ever sponsored in the IG’s history.

Reminder: CFP deadline Nov. 15 for CHIG-sponsored pre-conference, “New Histories of Communication Study”

Posted by on Nov 8, 2012 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

See the Call for Papers below: an exciting, CHIG-sponsored preconference for ICA London, June 16-17. The abstract deadline is November 15.

New Histories of Communication Study

International Communication Association Preconference London, June 16-17, 2013 Organizers: David W. Park and Peter Simonson

This preconference seeks to broaden, internationalize, and advance the history of communication study as a family of overlapping configurations and practices. It aims to bring together scholars from ICA, ECREA, IAMCR, NCA, and select rhetoric societies in an effort to stoke new, cross-national and cross-field conversations about the study of communication in long and broad historical perspective. It aspires to push the empirical and theoretical boundaries of histories and pre-histories of the field by attending to overlooked research areas, emerging conceptual orientations, and new axes of understanding and comparison among distinct traditions cutting across communication, media studies, cultural studies, journalism, and rhetoric, among other fields—and across institutional, intellectual, social, cultural, discursive, and material history. More specifically, it takes as its aims:

(1) To further internationalize the history of the fields and subfields of communication through papers that

  • a. are centered on world regions or nations that have received relatively little historical attention to this point;
  • b. are focused on the history of trans-national flows of influence, ideas, paradigms, texts, methods, research technologies, people, politics, power, other agentic forces contributing to the study of communication in the past; or
  • c. take up comparative analysis across nations or regions.

(2) To deepen, enrich, and empirically fill out the history of communication study through papers that

  • a. throw light on understudied dimensions of the academic study of communication as it developed over time;
  • b. make use of archival materials, oral histories, or other primary sources that have not found their way into the published history of the field to date, or have been underused;
  • c. advance a social history of the field that goes beyond ‘great men,’ landmark texts, and dominant forms of research—drawing attention, e.g., to patterns of labor, ordinary practitioners, pedagogical texts and practices, and points of articulation with everyday life and with publics beyond the academy;
  • d. provide institutional histories of important departments, journals, and professional associations
  • e. apply historical consideration to domains that have received less attention than some other subfields in the extant historiography of the field, including: internet studies, interpersonal communication research, forgotten avenues of communication research, marginal formations of all kinds, and more;
  • f. bring newer or under-utilized theoretical paradigms and analytic frameworks to bear on the history of the field—e.g. new materialisms, archaeology, post-colonial and critical race theory, feminist theory, and queer theory; or
  • g. critically engage existing histories and revise dominant understandings of individuals, institutions, ideas, schools, and practices.

(3) To broaden and cross-fertilize the history of communication study and related academic and non-academic fields through papers that

  • a. consider commercial, governmental, philanthropic, religious, therapeutic, or other non-academic versions of the study of communication as a family of social practices; or
  • b. draw out points of intellectual or socio-historical connection among communication-related fields whose histories and presents have often been kept separate of one another—e.g. rhetoric, hermeneutics, literary studies, journalism studies/Zeitungwissenschaft, information, media studies, cultural studies, and social scientific communication research.

If there is sufficient interest in this preconference, the planners hope to program the preconference as a two-day event. The two-day format would be intended as a way to foster conversation and networking among an international and institutionally diverse array of scholars, and to make a substantial contribution to the history of multiple fields and subfields of fields of communication.

Abstracts of 300 words (maximum) should be submitted no later than 15 November 2012. Send abstracts to: David Park at park@lakeforest.edu Authors will be informed regarding acceptance/rejection for the preconference no later than December 15, 2012. In an effort to facilitate informed discussion of papers, the organizers hope to have the papers for this preconference posted online. For this reason, full papers will need to be submitted no later than May 15, 2013. The pre-conference will take place on June 17, and if it becomes a two-day preconference, it will take place on June 16 and 17.

This preconference will be held at London Metropolitan University. The organizers wish to thank Sheila Lodge for providing access to these facilities.

Nicole Maurantonio Elected CHIG Secretary

Posted by on Nov 6, 2012 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Nicole Maurantonio, University of Richmond, has been elected as the Interest Group’s next Secretary. Nicole will take up her new duties when she succeeds Deb Lubken after the London 2013 conference.

Congratulations to Nicole!

CFP: CHIG-sponsored ICA preconference: New Histories of Communication Study

Posted by on Aug 29, 2012 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

See the Call for Papers below: an exciting, CHIG-sponsored pre conference for ICA London, June 16-17.

New Histories of Communication Study

International Communication Association Preconference London, June 16-17, 2013 Organizers: David W. Park and Peter Simonson

This preconference seeks to broaden, internationalize, and advance the history of communication study as a family of overlapping configurations and practices. It aims to bring together scholars from ICA, ECREA, IAMCR, NCA, and select rhetoric societies in an effort to stoke new, cross-national and cross-field conversations about the study of communication in long and broad historical perspective. It aspires to push the empirical and theoretical boundaries of histories and pre-histories of the field by attending to overlooked research areas, emerging conceptual orientations, and new axes of understanding and comparison among distinct traditions cutting across communication, media studies, cultural studies, journalism, and rhetoric, among other fields—and across institutional, intellectual, social, cultural, discursive, and material history. More specifically, it takes as its aims:

(1) To further internationalize the history of the fields and subfields of communication through papers that

  • a. are centered on world regions or nations that have received relatively little historical attention to this point;
  • b. are focused on the history of trans-national flows of influence, ideas, paradigms, texts, methods, research technologies, people, politics, power, other agentic forces contributing to the study of communication in the past; or
  • c. take up comparative analysis across nations or regions.

(2) To deepen, enrich, and empirically fill out the history of communication study through papers that

  • a. throw light on understudied dimensions of the academic study of communication as it developed over time;
  • b. make use of archival materials, oral histories, or other primary sources that have not found their way into the published history of the field to date, or have been underused;
  • c. advance a social history of the field that goes beyond ‘great men,’ landmark texts, and dominant forms of research—drawing attention, e.g., to patterns of labor, ordinary practitioners, pedagogical texts and practices, and points of articulation with everyday life and with publics beyond the academy;
  • d. provide institutional histories of important departments, journals, and professional associations
  • e. apply historical consideration to domains that have received less attention than some other subfields in the extant historiography of the field, including: internet studies, interpersonal communication research, forgotten avenues of communication research, marginal formations of all kinds, and more;
  • f. bring newer or under-utilized theoretical paradigms and analytic frameworks to bear on the history of the field—e.g. new materialisms, archaeology, post-colonial and critical race theory, feminist theory, and queer theory; or
  • g. critically engage existing histories and revise dominant understandings of individuals, institutions, ideas, schools, and practices.

(3) To broaden and cross-fertilize the history of communication study and related academic and non-academic fields through papers that

  • a. consider commercial, governmental, philanthropic, religious, therapeutic, or other non-academic versions of the study of communication as a family of social practices; or
  • b. draw out points of intellectual or socio-historical connection among communication-related fields whose histories and presents have often been kept separate of one another—e.g. rhetoric, hermeneutics, literary studies, journalism studies/Zeitungwissenschaft, information, media studies, cultural studies, and social scientific communication research.

If there is sufficient interest in this preconference, the planners hope to program the preconference as a two-day event. The two-day format would be intended as a way to foster conversation and networking among an international and institutionally diverse array of scholars, and to make a substantial contribution to the history of multiple fields and subfields of fields of communication.

Abstracts of 300 words (maximum) should be submitted no later than 15 November 2012. Send abstracts to: David Park at park@lakeforest.edu Authors will be informed regarding acceptance/rejection for the preconference no later than December 15, 2012. In an effort to facilitate informed discussion of papers, the organizers hope to have the papers for this preconference posted online. For this reason, full papers will need to be submitted no later than May 15, 2013. The pre-conference will take place on June 17, and if it becomes a two-day preconference, it will take place on June 16 and 17.

This preconference will be held at London Metropolitan University. The organizers wish to thank Sheila Lodge for providing access to these facilities.

Videos from the “Historiography as Intervention” Preconference

Posted by on Jul 31, 2012 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Check out YouTube videos from the Historiography as Intervention preconference, held last May in Pheonix at the annual ICA meeting .

Thanks again to Travers Scott and Devon Powers for organizing the preconference and arranging for the video capture.